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If you want to be in the know about what’s going on at our organization, you’ve come to the right place!

Be sure to check back regularly to get our latest news updates.


NHF is very pleased to announce that the Kevin Child Scholarship (KCS) application deadline has been set for August 2, 2021! The scholarship is named in tribute to Kevin Child, who died of AIDS in 1989, shortly before graduating from college. It is awarded annually to a student with hemophilia who is about to enter or currently enrolled in a program of higher education.  

Shared decision making (SDM), the concept by which patients and healthcare providers work closely together to arrive at personalized treatment-related decisions, can have significant positive impacts for individuals with hemophilia.

A new paper published in The Journal of Haemophilia Practice advances the concept of shared decision making (SDM) between the hemophilia patient and their healthcare provider (HCP).

A new article, “Emerging Immunogenicity and Genotoxicity Considerations of Adeno-Associated Virus Vector Gene Therapy for Hemophilia,” was published in the Journal of Clinical Medicine (JCM).



In this review, the authors discuss some of the primary considerations relevant to investigational gene therapies that employ adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors, with particular focus on immunogenicity and genotoxicity – the former denotes the ability of a foreign substance to trigger an immune response, while the latter refers to a substances ability to damage genetic material.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media Contact

Ilana Ostrin

iostrin@hemophilia.org

212-328-3769

FOR PUBLIC COMMENT - JUNE 3, 2021

BioMarin recently reported key findings from preclinical studies of their investigational, gene therapy Roctavian (valoctocogene roxaparvovec), which was developed for the treatment of adults with severe hemophilia A. The findings were presented at the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy (ASGCT) Virtual Meeting, which was held May 11-14, 2021.

The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) today, in conjunction with the American Kidney Fund (AKF), Arthritis Foundation, and American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA), released findings from a new national online survey of patients and caregivers that illustrates the alarming challenges t

Important research using data from the My Life, Our Future (MLOF) Research Repository Phase One has been published in Frontiers in Medicine.

“Scholarship season” is now in full swing, time for an appointment reminder!

uniQure recently announced that their commercialization and license agreement with CSL Behring  for their investigational hemophilia B gene therapy was finally closed on May 5, 2021 – the agreement had been pending the completion of a series of antitrust reviews in the U.S., Australia, and the U.K.

Findings from a recently published study in the Journal of Anesthesia suggest that pregnant patients with hemophilia whose factor VIII or IX levels drop below 50% at the time of receiving neuraxial anesthesia are more likely to experience postpartum complications.

Hemophilia Treatment Centers (HTCs) across the United States are participating in the 2021 National HTC Patient Satisfaction Survey. If you, or someone you care for, had contact with the HTC in 2020, they want to hear from you! You can take the survey online at www.htcsurvey.com, or fill out the paper survey you received in the mail. The survey closes on June 30, 2021.

NHF's Wednesday Webinars for May 2021 will focus on Women's Health Month,  featuring topics  of interest to both patients and healthcare providers who are interested in issues faced by women with inheritable blood disorders.

May Webinars

All webinars are from 2:00pm-3:00pm ET.

May 5, 2021

VWD Guidelines: Diagnoses

Speaker: Robert Sidonio, MD

 

May 12, 2021

uniQure recently announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has removed a clinical hold on their hemophilia B gene therapy program. The FDA had determined that uniQure satisfactorily addressed all issues raised by the agency that were related to a single patient diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), a common form of liver cancer.

Kevin Mills, PhD has joined the National Hemophilia Foundation as chief scientific officer.

A graduate of University of Colorado Boulder, MIT, and Harvard Medical School, Dr. Mills will be responsible for overseeing NHF’s research strategy, including developing and expanding the foundation’s research capabilities, and setting research goals.

Dear NHF Family,

Like everyone else, I was closely following the trial and eventual verdict in the case of Derek Chauvin for the murder of George Floyd, and I know that many of you were anxiously awaiting as well. Mr. Floyd’s death was senseless and an ugly act of violence.

It was my hope that the jury would evaluate the facts and render a a fair verdict, and in turn, pave the way for greater accountability at all levels of our society, including law enforcement.

NHF's Wednesday Webinars for April 2021 will feature an array of speakers and topics of interest to both healthcare providers and patients and families with blood disorders alike.

April Webinars
All webinars are from 2:00pm-3:00pm ET.

April 7th, 2021
What is the Burden of Problem Joints with Hemophilia?

Speaker: Paul McLaughlin

April 14th, 2021
WFH Humanitarian Aid Program

Speaker: Assad Haffar

The American Rescue Plan (ARP), signed into law on March 11, 2021, provides new opportunities to get health insurance coverage, and/or to reduce the cost of your premiums. Review your coverage now to make sure you are maximizing your benefits under the new law.

 

uniQure recently announced the results of a comprehensive investigation into a case of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosed in one patient participating in the phase III HOPE-B pivotal trial of etranacogene dezaparvovec, the company’s investigational gene therapy candidate for individuals with severe and moderately severe hemophilia B.

uniQure recently announced the results of a comprehensive investigation into a case of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) diagnosed in one patient participating in the phase III HOPE-B pivotal trial of etranacogene dezaparvovec, the company’s investigational gene therapy candidate for individuals with severe and moderately severe hemophilia B.

To the members of the inheritable blood disorders community,

Let me begin with a word for the thousands of members of our community – patients, providers, partners, family, and friends – who are also members of the Asian and Pacific Islander community:

We would not be the National Hemophilia Foundation without you.

The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) announced that Keri L. Norris, PhD, MPH, MCHES, has joined NHF as  vice president of health equity, diversity, and inclusion. Dr. Norris has more than 20 years of experience in health equity, public health, and social justice, with a particular emphasis on health disparities. Her role will be to create a health equity framework to integrate into NHF programs and services and develop culturally and linguistically appropriate programs and services to address disparities in outcomes within our community.

The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) announce plans for a NHF State of the Science Research Summit to bring together the inherited bleeding disorders community for a virtual conference to identify and accelerate research progress in the areas of greatest need for affected individuals and their families. The event is scheduled to be held virtually September 12-15, 2021.

In Genentech’s ongoing efforts to transparently communicate with the hemophilia community, we are sharing two updates to the Hemlibra label that were requested by the FDA. These changes, which were accepted and implemented on March 10, 2021, impact the Warnings and Precautions (sections 5.1 and 5.2) and Clinical Pharmacology (section 12.3) sections of the label.​ Importantly, the overall benefit/risk profile of Hemlibra remains positive.

The Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MASAC) of the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) issued three new documents, all of which were adopted by NHF’s Board of Directors on March 4, 2021.

The Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MASAC) of the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) issued three new documents, all of which were adopted by NHF’s Board of Directors on March 4, 2021.

The National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) is refocusing its mission statement to reflect a renewed emphasis on research and an expanded scope to include inheritable blood disorders.

The newly adopted mission statement reads:

The mission of the National Hemophilia Foundation is dedicated to finding cures for inheritable blood disorders and to addressing and preventing the complications of these disorders through research, education, and advocacy, enabling people and families to thrive.

The National Hemophilia Foundation is now accepting nominations for its Awards of Excellence. These awards honor members of the bleeding disorders community who have made outstanding contributions to improving the lives of people with bleeding disorders through treatment and care, advocacy, and raising awareness.

The Children’s National Hospital and Takeda recently announced the creation of a new, first-of-its-kind program to help standardize and streamline the process of diagnosis and care for individuals with rare diseases.

NHF's Wednesday Webinars for March 2021 will feature an array of speakers and topics of interest to both healthcare providers and patients and families with blood disorders alike.

March Webinars
All webinars are from 2:00pm-3:00pm ET.

 

March 3, 2021

Cellular Therapies for Hemophilia 

Speakers: Amy Shapiro, MD, Indiana Hemophilia & Thrombosis Center, Inc. and Deya Corzo, MD, Sigilon Therapeutics

 

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has partially rescinded a pair of supplemental Biologics License Applications (BLAs) the agency had granted, in error, for two recombinant factor IX products, BeneFIX® (Pfizer) and IXINITY (Aptevo). The supplemental BLAs in question were both approved by the FDA in 2020 and represented additional indications that ultimately ran against exclusivity rights of another product.   

Background:

Joint statement from the European Hemophilia Consortium, the World Federation of Hemophilia, and the National Hemophilia Foundation


Fitusiran update following EAHAD 2021 Congress

Octapharma recently announced the final results from the NuProtect study, which evaluated the immunogenicity of Nuwiq® in previously untreated patients (PUPs) with severe hemophilia A.Nuwiq® is a recombinant factor VIII therapy, is indicated for on-demand treatment and control of bleeding episodes and routine prophylaxis to reduce the frequency of bleeding episodes and perioperative m

Spark Therapeutics announced preliminary data from part one of their ongoing phase 1/2 open-label, non-randomized, dose-finding study of SPK-8016, the company’s investigational gene therapy for hemophilia A.

Come the Spring of 2021 patients and caregivers will be presented with a new opportunity to provide valuable feedback on the care they receive at hemophilia treatment centers (HTC) across the United States.

NHF's Wednesday Webinars for February 2021 will feature an array of speakers and topics of interest to both healthcare providers and patients and families with blood disorders alike.

February Webinars
All webinars are from 2:00pm-3:00pm ET.

On January 28th, 2021, President Biden signed an executive order aimed at stabilizing and strengthening the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicaid. The President specifically stated that this order does not change any law but rather rolls back actions taken by the Trump administration over the last four years.

BioMarin recently announced positive updates from its ongoing phase 3 GENEr8-1 study of valoctocogene roxaparvovec, an investigational gene therapy for the treatment of adults with severe hemophilia A. The trial currently includes 134 participants, all of whom have received a single dose of the therapy and have been observed for at least one year post treatment.

CSL Behring has announced a voluntary pharmacy level product recall of one batch of Mononine Coagulation Factor IX (Human), a plasma-derived product used to treat hemophilia B. CSL Behring’s notification states, “Patients can continue to use product they may have. Although the potential for safety risk to patients is considered low, it cannot be fully excluded.”

The affected batch is identified as: P100125501

The new joint clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease, developed by the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF), and the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) now have snapshot guides available in English, Spanish, and French.

The snapshots provide a high-level summary of both the diagnosis and management of VWD.

 

The new joint clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease, developed by the American Society of Hematology (ASH), the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF), and the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) now have snapshot guides available in English, Spanish, and French.

The snapshots provide a high-level summary of both the diagnosis and management of VWD.

 

“From Principles to Practice: Preparing for the Advent of Gene Therapy” represents the newest educational activity in Medscape’s series “Clinical Advances in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia.” Presented through a collaboration between Medscape and the National Hemophilia Foundation, the series includes various discussions relevant to the latest data on gene therapy as well as the practicalities associated with using gene therapy for hemophilia.

“From Principles to Practice: Preparing for the Advent of Gene Therapy” represents the newest educational activity in Medscape’s series “Clinical Advances in Gene Therapy for Hemophilia.” Presented through a collaboration between Medscape and the National Hemophilia Foundation, the series includes various discussions relevant to the latest data on gene therapy as well as the practicalities associated with using gene therapy for hemophilia.

Organizations Collaborate to Develop International State-of-the-Art Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of von Willebrand Disease
bmarshall
Jan 11, 2021

Jan 11, 2021

 The American Society of Hematology (ASH), the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF), and World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) have developed joint clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease (VWD), the world’s most common inherited bleeding disorder. The guidelines were published today in Blood Advances.

VWD affects approximately 1% of the world’s population, and it is the most common bleeding disorder. Although VWD occurs among men and women equally, women are more likely to notice the symptoms because of heavy or abnormal bleeding during their menstrual periods and after childbirth. This inherited condition results in the decreased production, absence, or abnormal function of the clotting protein von Willebrand factor.

VWD can cause unusual bleeding from small wounds or minor procedures, frequent nosebleeds, bruising, bleeding in joints, and heavy menstrual periods and post-partum bleeding in women. Symptoms may vary from patient to patient or in a single patient over the course of his or her life. Primary care providers, pediatricians, obstetricians, and gynecologists who observe unusual bleeding often refer their patients to a hematologist for further testing and management. Many individuals with mild symptoms do not receive a diagnosis right away and live for many years with untreated bleeding or do not realize they have VWD until they experience a severe bleed that could have been prevented.

“While VWD is a common bleeding disorder, it is also complex, presenting challenges in the timely diagnosis and appropriate management of bleeding for patients,” said 2021 ASH President Martin S. Tallman, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  “Because diagnosis is not straightforward and symptoms range in severity, there is a need for trustworthy guidelines to help improve the quality of care for patients. There are no better partners for ASH in this effort than ISTH, NHF, and WFH, whose collective expertise in VWD from the scientific and patient perspectives around the world enhanced this effort.”

Notably, the guidelines make key statements on thresholds of laboratory testing to classify VWD to be more inclusive of patients who experience bleeding, but whose blood work does not meet currently accepted thresholds for diagnosis. In addition, the guidelines for the first time recommend that VWD patients who suffer from frequent, severe bleeding that decreases quality of life should receive routine VWD prophylaxis – an injectable concentrate of clotting protein – several times a week. Together, the guidelines on diagnosis and management include a combined 19 recommendations.

The guidelines were developed by two expert panels made up of 32 individuals, including U.S.-based and international hematologists, individuals living with VWD, and scientists with expertise in evidence synthesis and appraisal and guideline development methodology. Clinical questions were developed by the panels and prioritized, and an international survey was completed to identify the most important clinical questions. A systematic review of available evidence was conducted by the University of Kansas Medical Center and the panel referred to this evidence to make recommendations. This process shed light on the lack of strong evidence on which to base recommendations, and therefore the report calls for more research.

“These guidelines are an excellent example of collaboration across multiple societies ensuring that the guidelines develop represent the most up to date and relevant advice about diagnosis and treatment of this common, but often misunderstood bleeding disorder,” said ISTH Past President Claire McLintock, MD. “Working as part of the incredible team that developed the guidelines in diagnosis of VWD was hugely rewarding and inspiring.”

People with VWD made up approximately one quarter of each guideline panel’s composition. As full voting members they contributed their expertise to every aspect of the rigorous guideline development process, from the prioritization of clinical questions, through the evaluation of the available evidence, to the consideration of factors such as stakeholder values and preferences, equity, and feasibility. Their involvement, actively supported by the panel chairs and collaborating organizations, was critical to ensuring the development of recommendations with the greatest pertinence and in which the community will have great confidence. Collaboration with WFH and NHF was essential to engaging the broader VWD patient community.

With their extensive established functional networks with healthcare professionals in centers for comprehensive care of bleeding disorders and patient organizations throughout the US and around the world, the four collaborating organizations, ASH, ISTH, NHF, and WFH will all play important roles in the creation and dissemination of resources based on the guidelines, and their implementation in individual care and broader advocacy efforts.

“These guidelines are an extremely important step in our quest to address the difficulties individuals go through to obtain an accurate, timely diagnosis, and appropriate treatment.  The challenge ahead will be for us to educate both those living with VWD and healthcare professionals on the guideline recommendations,” said Leonard Valentino, MD, President and CEO of NHF. “We were excited to work with ASH, ISTH, and WFH to create these and introduce them to the community.”

“In 2017 we gathered members of the global VWD community for the first WFH International Symposium on VWD. Delegates from countries around the world told us that the number one tool they needed in order to provide comprehensive care to people with VWD was clinical practice guidelines,” explained WFH President Cesar Garrido. “The WFH is very proud to deliver these guidelines today, with our partners from ASH, ISTH, and NHF, to the global community. In addition to offering guidance for clinicians and individuals with VWD as they partner in personalized care decisions, they constitute the foundation for important advocacy initiatives to improve access to the recommended diagnostic techniques and treatment options in all countries.”

The publication of the guideline will be accompanied by tools and educational resources to help patients, hematologists and other health care providers understand and implement the recommendations.

Related links about the new VWD guidelines:

•    VWD guidelines in Blood Advances

•    ASH resources

•    ISTH resources

•    NHF resources

•    WFH resources

About the American Society of Hematology

The American Society of Hematology (www.hematology.org) is the world’s largest professional society of hematologists dedicated to furthering the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting the blood. For more than 60 years, the Society has led the development of hematology as a discipline by promoting research, patient care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology. ASH publishes Blood (www.bloodjournal.org), the most cited peer-reviewed publication in the field, and Blood Advances (www.bloodadvances.org), an online, peer-reviewed open access journal. For more information about ASH’s portfolio of clinical practice guidelines, visit www.hematology.org/guidelines.

About the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis

Founded in 1969, the ISTH is the leading worldwide not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of thrombotic and bleeding disorders. ISTH is an international professional membership organization with more than 7,700 clinicians, researchers and educators working together to improve the lives of patients in more than 110 countries around the world. Among its highly regarded activities and initiatives are education and standardization programs, research activities, meetings and congresses, peer-reviewed publications, expert committees and World Thrombosis Day on 13 October. Visit ISTH online at www.isth.org.


About the National Hemophilia Foundation

NHF (the National Hemophilia Foundation) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to finding better treatments and cures for inheritable bleeding disorders and to preventing the complications of these disorders through education, advocacy and research. NHF’s programs and initiatives are made possible through the generosity of individuals, corporations and foundations, as well as through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Additional information on hemophilia and NHF can be found at www.hemophilia.org.

About the World Federation of Hemophilia

For over 50 years, the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH), an international not-for-profit organization, has worked to improve the lives of people with hemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders. Our vision of Treatment for All is that one day, all people with a bleeding disorder will enjoy a more certain future filled with promise, no matter where they live. For decades, we have been working around the world to improve diagnosis, treatment and ensure patients have sustainable access to care. We have a responsibility to deliver life-changing programs and services. Established in 1963, the WFH is a global network of patient organizations in 147 countries and has official recognition from the World Health Organization. Visit WFH online at www.wfh.org.

 

 

Organizations Develop Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Management of VWD
bmarshall
Jan 11, 2021

Jan 11, 2021

 The American Society of Hematology (ASH), the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH), National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF), and World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) have developed joint clinical practice guidelines on the diagnosis and management of von Willebrand disease (VWD), the world’s most common inherited bleeding disorder. The guidelines were published today in Blood Advances.

VWD affects approximately 1% of the world’s population, and it is the most common bleeding disorder. Although VWD occurs among men and women equally, women are more likely to notice the symptoms because of heavy or abnormal bleeding during their menstrual periods and after childbirth. This inherited condition results in the decreased production, absence, or abnormal function of the clotting protein von Willebrand factor.

VWD can cause unusual bleeding from small wounds or minor procedures, frequent nosebleeds, bruising, bleeding in joints, and heavy menstrual periods and post-partum bleeding in women. Symptoms may vary from patient to patient or in a single patient over the course of his or her life. Primary care providers, pediatricians, obstetricians, and gynecologists who observe unusual bleeding often refer their patients to a hematologist for further testing and management. Many individuals with mild symptoms do not receive a diagnosis right away and live for many years with untreated bleeding or do not realize they have VWD until they experience a severe bleed that could have been prevented.

“While VWD is a common bleeding disorder, it is also complex, presenting challenges in the timely diagnosis and appropriate management of bleeding for patients,” said 2021 ASH President Martin S. Tallman, MD, of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.  “Because diagnosis is not straightforward and symptoms range in severity, there is a need for trustworthy guidelines to help improve the quality of care for patients. There are no better partners for ASH in this effort than ISTH, NHF, and WFH, whose collective expertise in VWD from the scientific and patient perspectives around the world enhanced this effort.”

Notably, the guidelines make key statements on thresholds of laboratory testing to classify VWD to be more inclusive of patients who experience bleeding, but whose blood work does not meet currently accepted thresholds for diagnosis. In addition, the guidelines for the first time recommend that VWD patients who suffer from frequent, severe bleeding that decreases quality of life should receive routine VWD prophylaxis – an injectable concentrate of clotting protein – several times a week. Together, the guidelines on diagnosis and management include a combined 19 recommendations.

The guidelines were developed by two expert panels made up of 32 individuals, including U.S.-based and international hematologists, individuals living with VWD, and scientists with expertise in evidence synthesis and appraisal and guideline development methodology. Clinical questions were developed by the panels and prioritized, and an international survey was completed to identify the most important clinical questions. A systematic review of available evidence was conducted by the University of Kansas Medical Center and the panel referred to this evidence to make recommendations. This process shed light on the lack of strong evidence on which to base recommendations, and therefore the report calls for more research.

“These guidelines are an excellent example of collaboration across multiple societies ensuring that the guidelines develop represent the most up to date and relevant advice about diagnosis and treatment of this common, but often misunderstood bleeding disorder,” said ISTH Past President Claire McLintock, MD. “Working as part of the incredible team that developed the guidelines in diagnosis of VWD was hugely rewarding and inspiring.”

People with VWD made up approximately one quarter of each guideline panel’s composition. As full voting members they contributed their expertise to every aspect of the rigorous guideline development process, from the prioritization of clinical questions, through the evaluation of the available evidence, to the consideration of factors such as stakeholder values and preferences, equity, and feasibility. Their involvement, actively supported by the panel chairs and collaborating organizations, was critical to ensuring the development of recommendations with the greatest pertinence and in which the community will have great confidence. Collaboration with WFH and NHF was essential to engaging the broader VWD patient community.

With their extensive established functional networks with healthcare professionals in centers for comprehensive care of bleeding disorders and patient organizations throughout the US and around the world, the four collaborating organizations, ASH, ISTH, NHF, and WFH will all play important roles in the creation and dissemination of resources based on the guidelines, and their implementation in individual care and broader advocacy efforts.

“These guidelines are an extremely important step in our quest to address the difficulties individuals go through to obtain an accurate, timely diagnosis, and appropriate treatment.  The challenge ahead will be for us to educate both those living with VWD and healthcare professionals on the guideline recommendations,” said Leonard Valentino, MD, President and CEO of NHF. “We were excited to work with ASH, ISTH, and WFH to create these and introduce them to the community.”

“In 2017 we gathered members of the global VWD community for the first WFH International Symposium on VWD. Delegates from countries around the world told us that the number one tool they needed in order to provide comprehensive care to people with VWD was clinical practice guidelines,” explained WFH President Cesar Garrido. “The WFH is very proud to deliver these guidelines today, with our partners from ASH, ISTH, and NHF, to the global community. In addition to offering guidance for clinicians and individuals with VWD as they partner in personalized care decisions, they constitute the foundation for important advocacy initiatives to improve access to the recommended diagnostic techniques and treatment options in all countries.”

The publication of the guideline will be accompanied by tools and educational resources to help patients, hematologists and other health care providers understand and implement the recommendations.

Related links about the new VWD guidelines:

•    VWD guidelines in Blood Advances

•    ASH resources

•    ISTH resources

•    NHF resources

•    WFH resources

About the American Society of Hematology

The American Society of Hematology (www.hematology.org) is the world’s largest professional society of hematologists dedicated to furthering the understanding, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disorders affecting the blood. For more than 60 years, the Society has led the development of hematology as a discipline by promoting research, patient care, education, training, and advocacy in hematology. ASH publishes Blood (www.bloodjournal.org), the most cited peer-reviewed publication in the field, and Blood Advances (www.bloodadvances.org), an online, peer-reviewed open access journal. For more information about ASH’s portfolio of clinical practice guidelines, visit www.hematology.org/guidelines.

About the International Society of Thrombosis and Haemostasis

Founded in 1969, the ISTH is the leading worldwide not-for-profit organization dedicated to advancing the understanding, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of thrombotic and bleeding disorders. ISTH is an international professional membership organization with more than 7,700 clinicians, researchers and educators working together to improve the lives of patients in more than 110 countries around the world. Among its highly regarded activities and initiatives are education and standardization programs, research activities, meetings and congresses, peer-reviewed publications, expert committees and World Thrombosis Day on 13 October. Visit ISTH online at www.isth.org.


About the National Hemophilia Foundation

NHF (the National Hemophilia Foundation) is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization dedicated to finding better treatments and cures for inheritable bleeding disorders and to preventing the complications of these disorders through education, advocacy and research. NHF’s programs and initiatives are made possible through the generosity of individuals, corporations and foundations, as well as through a cooperative agreement with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Additional information on hemophilia and NHF can be found at www.hemophilia.org.

About the World Federation of Hemophilia

For over 50 years, the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH), an international not-for-profit organization, has worked to improve the lives of people with hemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders. Our vision of Treatment for All is that one day, all people with a bleeding disorder will enjoy a more certain future filled with promise, no matter where they live. For decades, we have been working around the world to improve diagnosis, treatment and ensure patients have sustainable access to care. We have a responsibility to deliver life-changing programs and services. Established in 1963, the WFH is a global network of patient organizations in 147 countries and has official recognition from the World Health Organization. Visit WFH online at www.wfh.org.

 

 

New Research Fellowship Available from NHF
bmarshall
Jan 11, 2021

Jan 11, 2021

The National Hemophilia Foundation has created a new research fellowship that seeks to create greater diversity in the field of benign hematology with the Jeanne M. Lusher Diversity Fellowship (JML). The fellowship, which hopes to foster career-long interest in inheritable bleeding and blood disorders, is open to Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) who are enrolled in a doctoral program in a biomedical field relevant to blood disorders. The goal of the fellowship is to identify clinicians from under-represented communities and genders early in their career and establish an interest in inheritable bleeding and blood disorders that will sustain them throughout their careers.

The fellowship honors the distinguished legacy of Dr. Jeanne M. Lusher, a pioneering clinician and researcher who died in 2016. Dr. Lusher’s tremendous impact on the bleeding disorders community began in 1961 when she helped to diagnose a young girl with a rare instance of hemophilia. As a researcher, she focused on inhibitor development in factor VIII patients. Along with a colleague, she was the first to identify inhibitors as antibodies to factor VIII in 1966. She authored more than 270 peer-reviewed papers, nine books and more than 60 book chapters. Dr. Lusher served as chair of NHF’s Medical and Scientific Advisory Council (MASAC) from 1994-2000.

“Dr. Lusher was a tremendous mentor to young hematologists who wanted to work with patients with bleeding disorders,” said Michelle Wiktop, DNP, NHF’s head of research.  “We hope this new fellowship will eventually create a research community that  reflects the diversity of the patient community we serve.”

More information on the JML Fellowship, including how to apply, can be found here.

The National Hemophilia Foundation has created a new research fellowship that seeks to create greater diversity in the field of benign hematology with the Jeanne M. Lusher Diversity Fellowship (JML). The fellowship, which hopes to foster career-long interest in inheritable bleeding and blood disorders, is open to Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) who are enrolled in a doctoral program in a biomedical field relevant to blood disorders.

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